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Why use #show vs #showtootip in a macro?

VOTES

3

Especially when recommending macros to other people?

I personally prefer to use #showtooltip but I honestly don't know why, so I'm throwing this up to the epic advice community to see what kinds of answers people can come up with.

I've already got the "because" covered with my answer, what do you think?

5 Answer(s)

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VOTES

1

#showtooltip shows the spell tooltip on mouseover and #show doesn't (I think).

It also updated based on whatever is the active spell for the macro. e.g. based on modifier key pressed etc.

Both #show and #showtooltip can take any spell name and [mod] options as parameters.

e.g - DK dps/tanking dual spec switch macro

#show [spec:1] Parry; [spec:2] Bone Shield 
/usetalents [spec:1] 2; [spec:2] 1

0

Honestly I don't see any reason to use #show unless you don't want the tooltip coming up when you mouseover a talent, which is pretty stupid imo. Besides, unless you've got something weird going on it should automatically show the first spell used. – Nehi (Nov 2 2009 7:15 AM)

0

because, if you use modifiers, or your mouseover/focus target, to select which spell will be cast, it will change the icon to show that spell. – Baberth (Nov 2 2009 9:04 AM)

0

That is the exact use case I have in that example, its meant to be a visual indicator of the current spec, not those actual spells. – delongville (Nov 3 2009 10:16 PM)

VOTES

2

Because they perform different functionality.

Also, #show is only used when you use the ? icon, and is used to change the icon dynamically to which ever will be cast - or, if you're lazy like me, to prevent you needing to search out the correct icon from the list. Whereas #showtooltip will show the tooltip - should you have them turned on - of the spell that will be cast when you click the button/key.

There is nothing to prevent you from using both at the same time

0

Actually, there's no reason to use both #show and #showtooltip in the same macro. #showtooltip also provides the #show functionality, and if you use both in one macro, the second will be ignored. Source: http://www.wowwiki.com/Making_a_macro – Wikwocket (Nov 2 2009 10:14 AM)

0

well, colour me surprised... I'm sure that it used to be that you'd want both. – Baberth (Nov 2 2009 5:49 PM)

VOTES

6

One reason to use #show instead of #showtooltip is to tell apart multiple macros that use the same primary spell, but with different other details like targetting. If you just use #show, the tooltip will be the macro name, while if you use #showtooltip, the tooltips would be the spell info, which would be the same for both.

For example, let's say I have two macros for Power Infusion, one to cast it on myself and one to cast it on my mage friend.

The macros could be something like this:

Macro: PI myself
#show Power Infusion
/cast [target=player] Power Infusion

and

Macro: PI for DPS
#show Power Infusion
/target MagewithgreatDPS
/cast Power Infusion
/w MagewithgreatDPS I just cast Power Infusion on you!

Since I use #show, I can tell the buttons apart by their tooltips, which will say "PI myself" and "PI for DPS." If I had used #showtooltip, they would both just show the tooltip for Power Infusion, which is redundant, and really unnecessary since I know what PI does. And #show still shows me the spell cooldown and whether it is in range.

VOTES

3

The only other reason I could see to use #show is if you would hit the 255 character limit with #showtooltip, though you'd have to be a very sophisticated macro writer for 7 characters to matter. :)

0

With complex macros, especially /castsequence or /castrandom macros, it is actually relatively easy to reach the 255 character limit. – Spazmoosifer (Nov 3 2009 5:01 PM)

VOTES

1

Found on WoWWiki.com's Macro API page

Metacommands pass data to the WoW client to affect its appearance on the action bar. Metacommands are preceded by a "#" symbol. Unknown metacommands will be silently ignored.

#show - Affects the button's icon on the Action Bar.

#showtooltip - tooltip - Affects the button's icon and tooltip on the Action Bar.

I personally find, however, that if I am creating two different macros for the same spell (one for my target, and one for myself), I prefer to choose two different icons, negating the need to use either #show or #showtooltip.

Also, if I remember correctly, you can choose to not include either, and just use the ? icon and obtain the same results you would get by using #show, ultimately reducing the number of characters used by 12, which could allow you to add additional functionality to the macro.

0

#show is 12 characters? – ticktock (Nov 4 2009 2:04 AM)

0

Well, the 12 characters portion was sort of a response in a way to bookworm13's answer. If you choose to use the ? icon instead of #showtooltip, you would end up saving yourself the 12 characters. – Spazmoosifer (Nov 4 2009 3:09 PM)

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